All you need to know about EV chargers

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EV charger and EVSE (Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment) are often used interchangeably, but they refer to different parts of the charging system for electric vehicles.

An EV charger is the component within an EV that converts AC power from the grid into DC power to charge the vehicle’s battery.

An EVSE, on the other hand, is the equipment that supplies power to the EV charger. It typically includes the cord and plug that connects the EV to the power source, as well as any equipment needed to control and monitor the charging process.

In summary, EV charger is the component inside the vehicle and EVSE is the equipment that supplies power to the EV charger.

Types of EV chargers

There are several different types of electric vehicle (EV) chargers, each with their own unique characteristics and capabilities. The most common types of EV chargers include:

Level 1 charger: This is the most basic type of EV charger, and is typically included with the purchase of an EV. It is a 120-volt charger that can be plugged into a standard household outlet. Level 1 chargers are the slowest type of charge1 r, and can take up to 20 hours to fully charge an EV.

Level 2 charger: Level 2 chargers are more powerful than Level 1 chargers, and are typically installed in homes or workplaces. They use a 240-volt power source, similar to that of a clothes dryer or stove, and can fully charge an EV in as little as 4-8 hours.

Level 3 Charger (DC Fast Charger): Level 3 chargers are the most powerful type of EV charger and are typically found at public charging stations. They use a direct current (DC) power source and can charge an EV in as little as 20-30 minutes.

Wireless Charger: This type of charger uses magnetic induction to transfer energy between a charging pad and the vehicle, eliminating the need for a plug or cord. Plugless Power solutions are the first electric vehicle charging systems on the market that started offering this service.

Important things to know before buying an EV charger

When considering an electric vehicle charger, there are several things to keep in mind:

Charging speed

The charging speed is an important consideration when choosing an EV charger. It refers to how quickly the charger can charge the vehicle’s battery.

the charging speed depends on the battery capacity and the state of charge of the EV, a high charging speed could damage the battery if the battery is not designed to handle it.

  1. Level 1 chargers: these chargers have a low charging speed and can take up to 20 hours to fully charge an EV.
  2. Level 2 chargers: These chargers require a 240-volt power source and can fully charge an EV in as little as 4-8 hours.
  3. Level 3 chargers (DC Fast Charger): These chargers use a direct current (DC) power source and can charge an EV in 20-30 minutes.
  4. Wireless Charger: A typical EV has a battery bank ranging from 22 kWh to 60 kWh. With a 20 kW wireless charger, the battery can be fully charged in 1-3 hours. However, the charging rate is exponential, so a car can charge from near-zero to 80% in as little as 20-60 minutes, depending on the battery’s size. With a more powerful 50 kW charger, it would take just 8-24 minutes to reach 80% capacity.

Power source

The power source determines the type of charger and the amount of power that can be supplied to the EV.

It’s important to consider the power source, as it will determine the charging speed and the location where the charger can be used. It’s also important to check the compatibility of the charger with the power source and make sure that the power source is sufficient to charge the EV properly.

  1. Level 1 chargers: These chargers require a 120-volt power source.
  2. Level 2 chargers: These chargers are typically used for home or workplace charging. They require a 240-volt power source.
  3. Level 3 chargers (DC Fast Charger): These chargers require a dedicated power source, such as a high-voltage circuit, and use a direct current (DC) power source.
  4. Wireless Charger: These chargers typically require a power source of at least 208-240V AC, similar to the power required for a standard electric dryer or stove. The specific power requirements will depend on the make and model of the EV and the wireless charging system being used. Some EV manufacturers also offer their own wireless charging systems that are specifically designed to work with their vehicles. It is important to consult with the manufacturer or a qualified electrician to determine the specific power requirements for your EV and wireless charging system.

Compatibility

Compatibility is also an important factor to consider when purchasing an electric vehicle (EV) charger. Not all EV chargers are compatible with all types of EVs, so it’s important to check the compatibility before purchasing a charger.

Here are some of the things to consider when checking the compatibility of an EV charger:

  1. Charging Port Type: There are several different types of charging ports used by EVs, including J1772, CHAdeMO, and CCS. Not all chargers are compatible with all types of ports, so make sure to check the compatibility of the charger with the port on your EV.
  2. Voltage and Amperage: Different EVs have different voltage and amperage requirements, and not all chargers are compatible with all requirements. It is important to check the voltage and amperage of the charger and compare it to the voltage and amperage requirements of your EV.
  3. Connectors: Some EV chargers have specific connectors that are not compatible with all EVs, so it’s important to check the compatibility of the connector on the charger with the connector on your EV.
  4. Communication Protocols: Some EV chargers use specific communication protocols to communicate with the vehicle, it’s important to check that the charger and EV are compatible with the same protocol.
  5. Software and Firmware: Some EV chargers may require specific software or firmware updates in order to be compatible with certain EVs. It is important to check if any updates are required and how to obtain them.

Cost

The cost of electric vehicle (EV) chargers can vary greatly depending on the type and features of the charger.

Level 1 chargers: which are the most basic type of charger are generally the least expensive. They are typically priced at around $100-$200.

Level 2 charger: can range in price from $500-$1,000. The cost will depend on the brand, features, and location where the charger is installed.

Level 3 chargers: can range in price from $10,000 to $50,000, with the cost varying depending on the location and the features of the charger.

Wireless chargers:. The cost of wireless charging pads can range from $1,000 to $3,000.

It’s important to do your research and compare prices from different manufacturers, suppliers and service providers to find the best deal on an EV charger that meets your needs.


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